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Crochet Standing Stitches

Updated May 4, 2023

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Have you ever wondered what Standing Stitches are? While there are many different types of stitches that can be used to create a wide range of patterns and textures, one technique that is particularly useful for starting a new round or row is a standing stitch. In this blog post, we will explore what standing stitches are, how they are used, and some tips for incorporating them into your crochet projects.

What are Standing Stitches?

Standing stitches are a technique used in crochet to start a new round or row without having to chain up and create a turning chain. Instead, the standing stitch is worked directly into the first stitch of the new round or row, creating a seamless transition from one section to the next. There are several different types of standing stitches, including standing single crochet, standing double crochet, and standing half double crochet, among others.

Why Use Standing Stitches?

There are several benefits to using standing stitches in your crochet projects. One of the main advantages is that they create a seamless transition from one section to the next, which can be particularly useful when working in the round or when changing colors. This can help to eliminate the unsightly gaps that can sometimes occur when chaining up to start a new round or row.

Additionally, using standing stitches can also help to create a more polished and professional-looking finished product. Because they eliminate the need for a turning chain, they can create a more even tension throughout the project, resulting in a smoother and more cohesive overall look.

Patchwork Blanket

Tips for Incorporating Standing Stitches into Your Crochet Projects

If you’re new to using standing stitches in your crochet projects, there are a few tips and tricks that can help you get started. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. Practice makes perfect. Like any new technique, it may take a bit of practice to get the hang of working with standing stitches. Start with a small project or practice swatch to get a feel for how they work before incorporating them into larger projects.
  2. Use the right hook size. When working with standing stitches, it’s important to use the right hook size to achieve the desired tension and gauge. Be sure to check the pattern or project instructions for the recommended hook size and adjust accordingly if necessary.
  3. Pay attention to stitch placement. Standing stitches are worked into the same place where the previous stitch was made, so it’s important to pay close attention to stitch placement to ensure that your stitches are even and consistent.
  4. Keep your tension even. As with any crochet project, maintaining even tension is key to achieving a neat and polished finished product. Take your time and focus on keeping your tension consistent as you work with standing stitches.
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Basic Crochet Stitches

If you’re not familiar with the basic stitches yet, I’d highly recommend practicing them first. Take a look at my absolute beginners post to learn these essential techniques.

Unsure of the differences between UK and US terms? Need a refresher on how to do your stitches? In my ‘How to crochet: A handy reference guide’ EBook I help you with all of these terms and you can always have them to hand! You will also get exclusive access to free video instructions. Learn more about the eBook here.

How to Crochet: A Handy Reference Guide EBook

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Stitch step by steps:

Standing Double Crochet (US Single Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have two loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through both loops on the hook. This completes the first double crochet stitch (US single crochet) of the round or row.
  5. Continue working double crochet stitches (US single) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Standing Half Treble Crochet (US Half Double Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, yarn over and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have three loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through all three loops on the hook. This completes the first half treble crochet stitch (US half double) of the round or row.
  5. Continue working half treble crochet stitches (US half double) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Standing Treble Crochet (US Double Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, yarn over and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have three loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through two loops on the hook. You will now have two loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over and pull through remaining loops on the hook.
  6. This completes the first treble crochet stitch (US double) of the round or row.
  7. Continue working treble crochet stitches (US double) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Standing Double Treble Crochet (US Treble Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, yarn over the hook twice and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have four loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through two loops on the hook. You will now have three loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through two loops on the hook. You will now have two loops on your hook.
  6. Yarn over and pull through remaining loops on the hook.
  7. This completes the double treble crochet stitch (US treble) of the round or row.
  8. Continue working double treble crochet stitches (US treble) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Video Tutorial

 
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Crochet Standing Stitches

Crochet Standing Stitches

Yield: Chainless Stitches when changing colour in a round or row

Standing stitches are a technique used in crochet to start a new round or row without having to chain up and create a turning chain. Instead, the standing stitch is worked directly into the first stitch of the new round or row, creating a seamless transition from one section to the next. There are several different types of standing stitches, including standing single crochet, standing double crochet, and standing half double crochet, among others.

Materials

  • This can be done with any yarn and corresponding hook.

Instructions

Standing Double Crochet (US Single Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have two loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through both loops on the hook. This completes the first double crochet stitch (US single crochet) of the round or row.
  5. Continue working double crochet stitches (US single) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Standing Half Treble Crochet (US Half Double Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, yarn over and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have three loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through all three loops on the hook. This completes the first half treble crochet stitch (US half double) of the round or row.
  5. Continue working half treble crochet stitches (US half double) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Standing Treble Crochet (US Double Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, yarn over and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have three loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through two loops on the hook. You will now have two loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over and pull through remaining loops on the hook.
  6. This completes the first treble crochet stitch (US double) of the round or row.
  7. Continue working treble crochet stitches (US double) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

Standing Double Treble Crochet (US Treble Crochet)

  1. Make a slip knot on your hook, leaving a long tail of yarn.
  2. Hold the slip knot in place with your finger, yarn over the hook twice and insert your hook into the designated stitch.
  3. Yarn over (wrap the yarn over the hook), and draw up a loop through the stitch. You should now have four loops on your hook.
  4. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through two loops on the hook. You will now have three loops on your hook.
  5. Yarn over again, and draw the yarn through two loops on the hook. You will now have two loops on your hook.
  6. Yarn over and pull through remaining loops on the hook.
  7. This completes the double treble crochet stitch (US treble) of the round or row.
  8. Continue working double treble crochet stitches (US treble) as normal for the rest of the round or row.

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8 Comments

  • Sue davis
    May 18, 2023 at 10:18 am

    Hi, can you use standing stitches when you make a chainless foundation row please?

    Reply
    • BellaCocoTeam
      May 18, 2023 at 9:16 pm

      You’d still have to make your chainless foundation in the usual way, but can then work a standing stitch into the beginning of the row if you wanted to change colour, for example

      Reply
  • Sara
    May 24, 2023 at 12:29 pm

    Hi
    I know you have excellent videos on most of the things I sometimes need a recap on. However, what I would really like is a written reference to all these handy techniques that have become available in the last decade or so. Does either your eBook, or your published book explain things like starting stitches, standing stitches, seamless joins, straight joins, jog-less joins etc. If not, might you do a modern crochet techniques book, as I think the crochet world really needs one? Information at the moment is so random and/or scattered. YouTube content (although amazing, thank you), can and does disappear for various reasons, so hence my wanting to have such a reference..

    Thanks for any response

    Reply
    • BellaCocoTeam
      June 27, 2023 at 10:04 am

      What a great idea, I will certainly think about this. Thank you for your suggestion 🙂

      Reply
  • Julia
    July 23, 2023 at 11:59 pm

    Are these stitches only for use when changing colour, or can they be used to start a row with the colour from the yarn below?
    I suppose I’m asking if the standing
    stitch can be used as an alternative to a stacked stitch at the start of a row, as well as being a chain alternative?

    Reply
    • BellaCocoTeam
      July 26, 2023 at 3:36 pm

      Hi Julia You would normally use a standing stitch whenever you’re starting a new row or round – if you’re continuing with the same colour it wouldn’t necessarily make sense to use a standing stitch as it would mean cutting the yarn first so you would end up with more ends to sew in than needed

      Reply
  • Virginia
    March 8, 2024 at 12:12 am

    Can the two methods for changing colors be combined (starting by finishing the previous row pulling up the new color then using a standing stitch (or a starting stitch)) instead of chaining?

    Reply
    • BellaCocoTeam
      March 13, 2024 at 4:01 pm

      Hi Virginia Standing stitches are used when the yarn isn’t already joined to the project; when you change colour by pulling through the new yarn, your yarn is already attached to the work so you’d need to work your chain stitches as normal

      Reply

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